break off phrasal

verb
1 (I, T) to suddenly stop doing something, especially talking to someone: Fay told her story, breaking off now and then to wipe the tears from her eyes.
(break sth off): I broke off the conversation and answered the phone.
2 (transitive break something off) to stop a relationship: break off relations/an engagement: Britain was about to break off diplomatic relations with Libya.
3 (T) to break a piece from the main part of something
(break sth off): I broke off a piece of bread. | break sth off sth: Why don't you break a branch off the tree and make a walking stick?

Longman dictionary of contemporary English. 2004.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • break off — phrasal verb Word forms break off : present tense I/you/we/they break off he/she/it breaks off present participle breaking off past tense broke off past participle broken off 1) [intransitive/transitive] to stop doing something, especially… …   English dictionary

  • break off — 1) PHR V ERG If part of something breaks off or if you break it off, it comes off or is removed by force. [V P] The two wings of the aircraft broke off on impact... [V P n (not pron)] Grace broke off a large piece of the clay... [V n P …   English dictionary

  • break off — UK US break (sth) off Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to stop, or to make something stop: »Talks between the two companies broke off over disagreements about the merger. »The company has decided to break off… …   Financial and business terms

  • ˌbreak ˈoff — phrasal verb to stop speaking Linda broke off, realizing that she was wrong.[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • break — break1 [ breık ] (past tense broke [ brouk ] ; past participle broken [ broukən ] ) verb *** ▸ 1 separate into pieces ▸ 2 fail to obey rules ▸ 3 make a hole/cut ▸ 4 destroy someone s confidence ▸ 5 when people learn news ▸ 6 stop for a short time …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • break — break1 W1S1 [breık] v past tense broke [brəuk US brouk] past participle broken [ˈbrəukən US ˈbrou ] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(separate into pieces)¦ 2¦(bones)¦ 3¦(machines)¦ 4¦(rules/laws)¦ 5¦(promise/agreement)¦ 6¦(stop/rest)¦ 7¦(end something)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • break away — verb 1. move away or escape suddenly (Freq. 2) The horses broke from the stable Three inmates broke jail Nobody can break out this prison is high security • Syn: ↑break, ↑break out • Derivationally relat …   Useful english dictionary

  • break — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 short rest; short holiday/vacation ADJECTIVE ▪ little, quick, short ▪ coffee, dinner (esp. BrE), lunch, tea (BrE) ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • phrasal verbs —    is a somewhat ungainly term for what is unquestionably one of the more versatile features of English namely, the ability to extend the meaning of verbs by attaching a particle to them. Thus in English we can break up, break off, break down,… …   Dictionary of troublesome word

  • break */*/*/ — I UK [breɪk] / US verb Word forms break : present tense I/you/we/they break he/she/it breaks present participle breaking past tense broke UK [brəʊk] / US [broʊk] past participle broken UK [ˈbrəʊkən] / US [ˈbroʊkən] 1) [transitive] to make… …   English dictionary


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